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NCIRE-The Veterans Health Research Institute is the leading private nonprofit institute devoted to Veterans health research in the United States. Our mission is to advance Veterans health through research.

We support the work of some of the nation's foremost physicians and scientists at the San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center, the premier biomedical research facility in the VA system. All have faculty appointments at the University of California, San Francisco, which has its own proud traditions of research and patient care. We also partner with the U.S. Department of Defense to support health research on behalf of our men and women in the Armed Forces.

Those who have served in uniform have given their best for their country. In return, we believe that they deserve nothing less than the best health care research we can provide.

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David Saloner, PhD

Director of the Vascular Imaging Research Center, SFVAHCS
Professor of Radiology, UCSF
Email: David.Saloner@ucsf.edu

Imaging Vascular Disease

The Vascular Imaging Research Center (VIRC), directed by Dr. Saloner, has conducted studies that investigate the use of non-invasive Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) methods for evaluating atherosclerotic disease.  These methods provide the ability to identify and grade areas of vascular narrowing which pose a threat of a stroke to patients.  These MRI methods are also able to examine the composition of the disease process in the vessel wall, a capability that was not previously possible with other modalities, and to identify important risk factors that are not apparent on other imaging methods. These methods avoid invasive arteriography, which has previously been the method of choice, providing a safer and more comprehensive evaluation for the large number of veterans who suffer from vascular disease.  The VIRC team has also developed new computational software capabilities that predict the influence of blood flow in the initiation and progression of disease.  This important capability is useful in gaining insight into factors that contribute to vascular disease, and strategies that can ameliorate that process.

To see Dr. Saloner on Pub Med, click here.